Thread: About Windows 11's high system requirements. You know, a lot of blind people, who don't have jobs, live on social security and disability money, and who definitely don't have the newest computers, won't get Windows 11. This could have been a great chance for Linux to step up and say loud and proud "Because we support every person's ability to choose their system, and use and learn about computers, we will never force upon users what system they must run. And because we stand proudly with people with disabilities, all blind people are welcome in the world of free and open source software, where they can learn and create just like everyone else."

But no. Gnome, one of the most popular desktops on Linux, is trash with accessibility. KDE is working on it, but that'll take years. Who's ever heard of Mate? And who makes current software for the command line, for users and not other developers?

Also, it's not enough that Gnome is trash, or KDE is slowly trying, or the command line is mainly for developers. When a user installs Linux and needs assistive technology, like Orca, they can't just enable it and go on their way. They have to check a box in settings to "enable" assistive technologies. That's a huge barrier, and shouldn't exist. But it does. Another roadblock. Why do these exist in a supposed welcoming community? Why do these exist if Linux is open to all? Why? If FOSS is communal, why are blind people, due to the huge barrier of entry, shut out of the FOSS OS? These are hard questions we should be working through. Why does the GUI require assistive technology support to be enabled in order for Orca to work with many apps? Why can't it be enabled by default? Does it slow stuff down? If so, why? And should we have to live with a slower OS because we're blind?

@devinprater
I think, you are right. And there is something you can do about it: provide a checklist on barrier-free design of UI. Most devs, who don't need assistive support, don't have a clue what this could be. They just don't know about it, because it's beyond their perception.
Just TELL them, what to do!

@wauz @devinprater

One of the things Microsoft is good at is funding UI research to see how people use computers and to meet national procurment laws they put the hard work into accessibility.

I watched https://emacsconf.org/2019/talks/08/ as an idea to try and understand how to use a computer without vision, but it could also help to have examples of use.

Someone once posted a recording a of screen reader going through an emojii heavy post, to make it very clear how annoying it is.

@alienghic @wauz Okay. Since a few people have asked about it, during my two week vacation, I'll work on documenting how blind people use computers. It'll be anopen Github... Sourcehut? Org-mode document because Emacs, and videos may be made in the future.

@devinprater @alienghic @wauz as early as 2001 there was a complete linux distro for the blind that booted with voice support and ran early gnome with orca by default. It was sponsored by the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) when Janina Sajka was their CTO. Several of their major donors, including Microsoft, objected, and demanded they not only stop projects, but fire her and others or would stop donating. So they did.

@tychosoft @alienghic @wauz Oh... Oh my. I didn't know that bit of history. Where can I read about this?

@devinprater @alienghic @wauz perhaps rednote, if it is still around. The AFB also had built a portable daisy talking book portable reader using linux, which also angered AFB donors.

@tychosoft @wauz @alienghic Oh if you get a chance, check out the Braille Plus. Nthe Braille Plus 18, but the original. It was a beautiful, small PDA for the blind, running, I believe, Alpine Linux with apps built by APH, American Printinghouse for the Blind. That was about the best assistive technology ever made. Now we're stuck with stupid Android toys that can't even show basic text formatting in braille, like older devices could.

@devinprater @tychosoft @wauz

That's an interesting device, and that keyboard supports a lot of characters with very few buttons.

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